Everything I'm Not made Me everything I Am.

1,197 notes

bobbycaputo:

10 Essential African-American Photographers

Thomas Allen Harris’ documentary Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People will be playing at New York’s Film Forum through September 9. “The film is a cornucopia of Americana that reveals deeply disturbing truths about the history of race relations while expressing joyous, life-affirming sentiments about the ability of [African-American] artists and amateurs alike to assert their identity through the photographic lens,” Film Forum writes. “What the film strives to say is, when everything around me is telling me I am not worth anything, I can present myself and have a likeness of myself and my talents that shows I have values,” Harris told the New York Times

(Continue Reading)

(via nerdgirlextraordinaire)

216 notes

And torn from Black Africa’s strand I came
To build a “homeland of the free.”

The free?

Who said the free? Not me?
Surely not me? The millions on relief today?
The millions shot down when we strike?
The millions who have nothing for our pay?
For all the dreams we’ve dreamed
And all the songs we’ve sung
And all the hopes we’ve held
And all the flags we’ve hung,
The millions who have nothing for our pay—
Except the dream that’s almost dead today.

O, let America be America again—
The land that never has been yet—
And yet must be—the land where every man is free.
The land that’s mine—the poor man’s, Indian’s, Negro’s, ME—
Who made America,
Whose sweat and blood, whose faith and pain,
Whose hand at the foundry, whose plow in the rain,
Must bring back our mighty dream again.

Langston Hughes (via socialismartnature)

558 notes

soulbrotherv2:

Who says black folk can’t swim?

Justin Lynch: US Swimming’s Next Michael Phelps?
By Shannon Sims
What do you do once you’ve beaten Michael Phelps’ record? At 16 years old?
For swimmer Justin Lynch, 18 last month, he just keeps practicing, chasing the dragon of his record-breaking memory, with an eye on the 2016 Rio Olympics.
That memory-making moment came at the USA Swimming finals last year. He’d broken a Phelps age-group record in the 100-meter butterfly at 14, but now competition was stiffer among the older swimmers. While many of his competitors in the 15–16 age group had already ballooned up with muscles and ripped six-packs, Lynch looked pretty ordinary, his appearance giving no hint at the beast in the water.
The moment was caught on tape. Once his outstretched fingertips hit the wall, Lynch lifted his head up to the outside world as the wave of water caught up with him. “I could hear my friends screaming at the end of the pool, but I didn’t know for sure until I turned around,” Lynch told OZY. He slowly, perhaps timidly, turned to see the four red numbers: 52.75. And a new era had begun. At only 16, Lynch had bested the best.
[Continue reading article at OZY.]

soulbrotherv2:

Who says black folk can’t swim?

Justin Lynch: US Swimming’s Next Michael Phelps?

By Shannon Sims

What do you do once you’ve beaten Michael Phelps’ record? At 16 years old?

For swimmer Justin Lynch, 18 last month, he just keeps practicing, chasing the dragon of his record-breaking memory, with an eye on the 2016 Rio Olympics.

That memory-making moment came at the USA Swimming finals last year. He’d broken a Phelps age-group record in the 100-meter butterfly at 14, but now competition was stiffer among the older swimmers. While many of his competitors in the 15–16 age group had already ballooned up with muscles and ripped six-packs, Lynch looked pretty ordinary, his appearance giving no hint at the beast in the water.

The moment was caught on tape. Once his outstretched fingertips hit the wall, Lynch lifted his head up to the outside world as the wave of water caught up with him. “I could hear my friends screaming at the end of the pool, but I didn’t know for sure until I turned around,” Lynch told OZY. He slowly, perhaps timidly, turned to see the four red numbers: 52.75. And a new era had begun. At only 16, Lynch had bested the best.

[Continue reading article at OZY.]

(via deep-in-guts)